Saturday, November 13

One New Language


Second Language Acquisition: An Introductory Course (Topics in Applied Psycholinguistics)Stories about children who speak up to ten different languages are no longer that much of a rarity. Possibly the genes they inherited have a say in all that, but there are things the rest of us mere mortals can and should do to unearth potential that lie around like hidden gems in the most unlikely kid. Just because a child is into sport does not mean he is incapable of learning a new language.  If Asian kids can speak English, which is a second language for them, brilliantly, I don't see why native speakers of English should cringe when it comes to a new language.



150 Fun Songs for Kids (Dig)
One new language other than English can widen your child's horizons considerably as he grows into an adult. But even guardians who go all out to secure their child's future in so many other ways rarely stop to consider this avenue of growth. Learning a new language does not have to be seen as curricular, or heavy stuff that adds to homework. It can be as simple as learning a rhyme, a song, a new kind of greeting, or a clever saying. Appreciation is the key, as it is with most things kids learn. Pretty soon, as they grow, the language grows with them. All you need to do is sow those all-important seeds of initial interest.

One new language, Ten new friends


Just Dance KidsThere are about 6,809 different languages in the world. In this age of globalization, it's only fair that you encourage your child to speak more than one. School grounds resonate with different languages these days and that is an indication of how cultures have escaped geographical boundaries to merge in mainstream communities. Often interest in a new language may result due to friendship with a child who speaks a different language. On the other hand, the ability to understand a new language can initiate life long friendships. 
Storybook International Collection 10 Disc Set

Where to learn a New Language

You can start early by reading stories and fairy tales from other cultures alongside Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk. Countries such as Japan, China, India among others have amazing folktales that will surely kindle an interest in kids reading them. Disney cartoons come with various language options these days. 

Bi-lingual parents have a neat advantage. They just have to speak to their child in their own tongue and soon enough, the kid starts to speak both languages fluently. There's no question of confusing them; they just know instinctively which is which. On the other hand, if they were to give up their own tongue and stick to, say for instance, English alone, they are in fact doing the kid a great injustice, though of course, they mean well. 

Rosetta Stone V4 TOTALe: English (American) Level 1Look for local clubs and community centres where they have foreign language classes. Join along with your child and share her enthusiasm. Use the new words, phrases and greetings without a sense of exaggeration. Applaud her efforts. In the absence of any local centres, get quality programmes on CDs such as the Rosetta Stone that tutor you in a variety of foreign languages or go online to fun sites where you don't even realize you're learning. 



Benefits of learning a New Language

Royal Machines RP Pro American Heritage Dictionary with Roget, Abbreviations, Translation & Spelling, SAT, Britannica CD Electronic Organizer (Grey)Knowing a language other than the mother tongue widens your child's horizons considerably. It acquaints him with a different culture and teaches him appreciation and respect for people who may look different. It also opens up career avenues in diplomatic circles, translation, and in multi-national businesses. And let's not underestimate what it does to excite those neurons and liven up the brain. It becomes a great bonding element between kids and parents, for you're all in this together. 

4 comments:

  1. Hi, You've got some real good points here.

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  2. Thanks, Betty. Keep reading:)

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  3. I completely agree with Liz and Betty.Over the recent decades,our world has become a "Global Village".Being bilingual helps the child to access other cultures and world in ways than those who are able to speak only one language.

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  4. Hi Mary, yes, being restricted to one language is not going to be much fun in the 21st century context.

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